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Blog posts tagged in depression

Posted by on in Artículos y entrevistas
Winter Blues

Winter blues is not a diagnosis but a general term and it means feeling sad and down, melancholic and unhappy and it´s related to the shortening of daylight hours and Autumn or Winter approaching. They are often linked to something specific, such as stressful holidays or reminders of absent loved ones. 

On the other hand, Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of affective disorder related to changes in seasons. The symptoms usually start in Autumn and continue into the winter months, and go away during the sunnier days of spring and summer. The symptoms may include: 

  • Feeling depressed
  • Losing interest in activities you once enjoyed
  • Low energy
  • Problems with sleeping
  • Changes in your appetite
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Feeling hopeless, worthless or guilty
  • Having thoughts of death

Winter blues are usually temporary and the symptoms disappear, while Seasonal Affective Disorder can last for several months. 

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I don’t feel good, how can I find out if I am depressed?

Depression manifests itself in many ways. Here you will find some of the typical signs of depression that are good to keep an eye on. When browsing the list, remember: You can easily have one or more of the signs without having a depression.

  • You feel depressed and sad: Some days are good; others are not good at all. That is how it is in life. It goes up and down. We are all hit by adversity and downturns: Boyfriend brakes up, you fail exams or lose your job. However, as a rule, we know well (deep down) that we will probably will be ok again - eventually.

 

With a depression, it is different. Here the sadness is experienced bottomless and endless. You feel that you cannot do anything to change things. Sometimes it is something specific that triggers a depression - for example, that you lose a person you loved very much. Other times, depression hits out of the blue without you knowing why.

 

After Life: A learning medium to help understand what happens to people who suffer from depression

 Depression, this word is associated with a lot of meanings that we’ve learnt according to the popular meaning of it in our society. The most popular notion that we all have is probably a sad person (be it for something specific or general) who spends the day in bed without being able to do anything due to a lack of energy, and that is how most of us have been sold the disorder through popular series and movies of our time. There is a reason why depression is the most popularly known mental disorder and it’s that at some point in life we ​​all have a passing episode of it, a period of time where we feel without energy, without the desire to do anything, and with a general sadness about everything or even a lack of emotions in general. But the truth is that depression encompasses many more things, and the fact of making it a popularly known phenomenon has also generated a large number of myths about it, myths such as depression is just a lack of desire, that over time the person who suffers it overcomes it without help, that depression appears because something bad has happened to us or that we can always see when a person is depressed. The truth is that none of this is totally true, depression englobes many different behavioural patterns and it is more common to find two completely different cases than are the same, even if it is the same disorder. 

Depression After a Cardiac Event

 

Interviewer: How can we improve quality of life in these patients?

 

Dr. Alberto: The most important thing would be to treat depression, as it has been established that depression more accurately predicts quality of life than other factors, such as lifestyle or other comorbidities. However, treatments that reduce depressive symptoms do not necessarily result in improved quality of life. Psychotherapy might be more effective as it directly targets general well-being. A recent meta-analysis by Hofmann et al concluded that both psycho-pharmacological treatment and cognitive behavioural treatment improved quality of life in depressed patients. Specific interventions should include enhancing socialisation (as isolation is a risk factor), treatment adherence and self-care. 

 

Interviewer: You mentioned before that there are specific measures to combat depression in patients who have suffered a cardiac event?

 

Dr. Alberto: Fortunately, most hospitals now have cardiac rehabilitation programs, which are a crucial element in the recovery of these patients. They form an essential component of the comprehensive management of cardiac patients, largely to reduce the detrimental emotional, psycho-social, and physical consequences of cardiac events. 

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