Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
Blog posts tagged in pandemic
What Type of E-Leader are You?

What kind of leader are you or how do you lead yourself in virtual environments? I ask you this question and not simply what kind of leader you are because at this point and after years of tsunamis of theories and talks about coaching and leadership, surely you have already identified with the charismatic leader, the authoritarian, the democratic, the inspiring ...

But suddenly, a global pandemic arrives that does not seem to end and if it does it will be after a technological sprint and having turned our work environments into virtual environments. With this new board and new rules, we are forced to redefine our leadership style, both with our teams and with ourselves.

Perhaps redefining is not the exact word but ADAPT, adapt to the new digital ecosystem, and adapt those factors of our leadership that gave us identities such as social skills, empathy, teamwork or ways of providing feedback. 

Pandemic Fatigue: 8 Keys to Overcome It

It has already been a year since the beginning of the health crisis caused by COVID 19. What was originally going to be just two weeks of confinement gradually became an almost endless situation. Months of confinement, locked up at home, with fear and uncertainty. And we still didn’t know what we were facing. Is there an actual risk? Is this just mass hysteria? Meanwhile, the news bombarded us with overwhelming information about risks, safety measures, social distancing, numbers and more numbers about the pandemic evolution, the “new normality” and its phases, and a long etcetera that we were listening to and trying to integrate into our everyday life. 

And when it was over, what did we found? Restrictions, fears, social distancing, curfew and more uncertainty. A contradictory socio-political environment that we couldn’t understand and a return to life very far from normality. Who would have guessed that more than a year later, the word “PANDEMIC” would still have such strength, and that we would have dealt with not one or two, but three waves, and thinking about a fourth?

Homesickness in Times of Pandemic

"You will never be completely at home again because part of your heart will always be elsewhere. That's is the price you pay for the richness of loving and knowing people in more than one place."

Mirim Adaney defines very well in this couple of sentences the difficulties of being an expatriate or living far away from our family and friends. All of us who have gone through this experience know how enriching and challenging it can be at the same time.

But what happens if we add to the difficulties of living away from home (often in a new culture and with a different language), the social distancing measures, and the restrictions due to COVID? Sounds complicated, doesn't it?.

 

It is, and it is primarily for two reasons:

  1. These measures are making the process of adapting to the new culture and the new place of residence very complicated, since they make it impossible or difficult to establish new social relationships and maintain regular routines such as going to the gym or attending language classes in person (places that foster the creation of new friendships and relationships as well as the establishment of routines that help us feel "at home").
  2. It is much more difficult, and in some cases impossible, to visit or return home to take a break, rest, and connect with our roots.

     

Posted by on in Artículos y entrevistas
Love at a Distance

"Long-distance relationships have a 48% failure rate." Almost one in two long-distance relationships fail as a result.

It is clear that globalization and new technologies have brought us closer to the point of forming multicultural families and couples. Thus, we create more diverse, enriching, and creative environments. 

 

But it is also true that more and more couples have long-distance relationships because they belong to different countries or because work or study circumstances make them live separately. 

 

We all know short distance relationships (neighbouring cities or a few kilometres), medium distance (different locations in the same country or nearby countries), or long-distance (in other continents and time zones) but who was going to tell us just ago a year that we could have a long-distance relationship being so close because we are confined to our homes or that we would have to change plans and plane tickets three, four or even five times. 

 

Of course, 2020 has left us many things, but one of them is the constant challenge to our ability to adapt and in the romantic sphere it was not going to be different. 

How to Take Care of my Child's Emotional Health in Times of A Pandemic

 

Since the beginning of times, human beings have been grouped into social entities, which has allowed them to defend themselves, reproduce, learn, and interact with the environment. Society and culture are fundamental aspects of human identity. Social interaction goes beyond mere genetic transmission, it is enriched in communication and cooperation between its members, which allows them to transmit knowledge and behaviors through learning. This is how culture is formed.

 

Culturally, social interaction occurs under: 

  • A close physical contact, 
  • Dates to go to the movies, eat or exercise; 
  • Birthdays and Holidays are highly celebrated surrounded by a ton of people
  • Big parties to celebrate weddings, Christmas or holidays traditions passed from generation to generation.  

All of them have in common the accumulation of people in closed or open spaces, with close proximity interactions.

How To Protect Your Voice In Mask Times

For a few months and due to COVID-19, mask use is mandatory whenever we are outside our home. Although the mask serves as a protective shield when communicating with others, so we don’t share bacteria or viruses with other people, it can have some negative consequences, such as having our voice damaged. The mask reduces the volume of our voice and distorts the sound of the words we use, so we are often forced to speak louder when we are using it. This continuous increase in the volume of the voice can cause the vocal cords to become irritated, and, if we do not take the necessary care, it can end in aphonia or dysphonia. 

 

When we speak of aphonia, we mean to lose the voice completely; while dysphonia refers to the alteration of our vocal quality, pitch or volume. Some examples of dysphonia are hoarseness or the inability to speak or sing in the range that one is used to, and it can be secondary to different disorders, such as nodules.

...
How to handle Procrastination in the midst of a Pandemic

You might have heard the term “procrastination" before, and it is likely you might have experienced it more than once. The definition of the word is: deciding to delay or not complete a task for no valid reason despite the negative consequences of doing so. Making time for doing something of more importance or urgent than the task we are delaying, would not be considered procrastinating. Neither would be making time for an unforeseen event. We procrastinate when there is no good reason to delay the action.

The procrastination cycle has the following steps: I face a task that generates discomfort or negative feelings (I don’t feel like doing it, it’s frustrating, boring, difficult, makes me anxious…) à I try to avoid that discomfort by engaging in another pleasurable task or postponing my goal à I immediately feel better à I face negative consequences long term.

Hits: 11564

This Web Site uses our own or third-party cookies to improve your experience on our web, as well as to analyse its web traffic.

This Cookies Policy must be expressly accepted in order to continue browsing. You can check the Cookies Policy by clicking here

Accept