On Children and Gratitude

On Children and Gratitude

How many of us can think back to our childhood days and remember our parents, grandparents and even early-years teachers urging us to say thank you when we were presented with a gift, a nice gesture or a helping hand?

I certainly remember that showing appreciation and being thankful was tremendously important for the grown-ups around me. With time, I understood that people felt good when I said thank you to them, but before empathy entered the picture, thankfulness felt like one of those things I had to do, one more rule to go by: Saying thank you was equivalent to being polite.

Politeness was and continues to be a highly valued quality among humans. One to make sure our children possess and carry with them. After all, if we stop to really be honest for a moment, we can agree that politeness speaks well of the child that practices it, while also singing hidden praises to the caregivers responsible for that child. We could agree that it is a social skill that opens doors. A win-win all around. But in this case, politesse is merely one small part of a much bigger stance: Gratitude.

And if we were conscious about the psychological weight of gratitude as general value, we would be less concerned with mere politeness. Harvesting gratitude would then become a must (something just as important as promoting mathematical dexterity, if not more).

In general terms, gratitude is associated with the capability of being thankful, but because gratitude has been the subject of psychological interest for many years, we now know that it is a little bit more complex than that.

Robert Emmons, a Professor of Psychology at the University of California, considered one of the leading scientific experts on gratitude, approaches it as a two-stage process:

According to Emmons, the first stage consists of the “acknowledgment of goodness in one's life”.

Gratefulness -therefore- begins, when someone stops to be aware of the fact that they have received something (whether it be recently or long ago).

The Second part of the process consists of the recognition that the “source (s) of this goodness lie, at least partially, outside the self”. It is then safe to say that Gratitude is directly related to humility: We are conscious of the fact that something or someone, provided us with something and that something contributed to our well-being. 

To me, it all sounds like a big gift. A magical process in which we can appreciate goodness in our own existence and contact with positive emotions along the way. But that isn´t all there is to it. Experiments in the gratitude realm have directly linked it to a more optimistic look on life, increased sense of connectedness to others, longer and better quality of sleep time and fewer reported physical symptoms such as pain. (From an interview to Mr. Robert Emmons published in the SharpBrains blog on 2007).

So how can we teach our children the attitude of gratitude, which holds and includes politeness but transcends it?

  • Model it. Behavioralist psychologist understood -throughout their investigations many years ago- that visually demonstrating a behavior so that it could be reproduced by the observer, was a key part of the learning experience. Is therefore safe to conclude that If you wish to cultivate gratefulness, you need to show a child what being grateful looks like. Imagine for example that you go for a walk at a park or in the woods, in the middle of autumn: It is a great opportunity to practice being grateful. You can model excitement about the fact that you get to see all the different shades of yellow, orange and red. You can open your eyes wide, and using an excited tone of voice go into the details of what you can see and are “amazed by”, ending it with a “it´s so cool or its so nice that we get to see this and be here together”.
  • Create a family gratitude ritual. Depending on how the family schedule runs, you can take a moment daily to say what each family member is thankful for (at the dinner table or perhaps after reading the bedtime story…) Depending on the child’s age you will need to use simpler words such as : “I’m happy that today…x”, for example. If schedules are complex and mom can be present at bedtime, for example, but dad can´t, creating a gratitude jar is an option. Assign each family member a color of paper. Throughout the week, when someone is grateful or happy about something, they can write it down and place their piece of paper inside the jar. During the weekend, the family can make it a habit to sit down with some refreshments and read the content of the jar.
  • Promote the overt expression of gratitude using thank you notes/post cards or letters. If you take into considerations Robert Emmons definition of gratitude, you will comprehend that gratitude is active and that it requires thought and intention. By encouraging our children to write thank you notes, we will be helping them to stop and think of the actions and/or gestures that someone directed at them and that were therefore, helpful, allowing them to experience positive emotions. They will also get a chance to see in return, how their words contribute to someone else’s´ emotions and day.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

Emotional validation: A fundamental need in childhood and adolescence.

Emotional validation: A fundamental need in childhood and adolescence.

I can’t remember exactly how old I was, but I was still small. The memory I am a bout to share happened definitely some years before my 10th birthday. I can’t remember exactly what had happened either or why I was upset, but I remember I was and I also remember that my inner turmoil had carried on for some days. By this point you must be wondering why I’ve chosen to tell a story which facts I do not seem to have in a straightforward manner. The answer is simple: because I remember how I felt.

Let´s go back to the story. As a result of my sadness, I spoke to one of the significant adults in my life about whatever it was that was occurring. Their answer -slight grunt included- went somewhere along the lines of “well, this can´t continue, something needs to be done and we need you to help us out with it”. I distinctly remember the tone of voice in which this was said to me and the expression on the person´s face, maybe the words weren’t exactly as I phrased them here, but I vividly remember the emotional tone of the whole interaction. One could argue the message in itself was good because after all, the adult in question was letting me know they were going to help me, but I remember feeling tense, worried and a little overwhelmed. I thought to myself “uh oh, this person is stressed and worried now and its because of me”. Having thought about this scene several times and years after, I was able to clarify something I was experiencing and didn’t quite know how to articulate at the time my foggy memory occurred: I felt as if there was a sense of urgency being conveyed to me, as if I need to “get well fast”, but no such words where actually used. It was as if there was no space for what I was feeling, and even though I know that this adult was well intentioned and that I mattered to them, this action-oriented problem-solving approach was short of a very crucial step that should have preceded it: emotional validation

What is emotional validation and why is it so important?

Personal experiences always awaken emotions. Human existence cannot be understood without taking feelings into account and feelings are what allow us to connect with others. We validate someone emotionally when we convey to them that their experiences, emotions and thoughts are recognized, make sense and are accepted. It´s an act of true human connection and everyone needs to feel it on a regular basis throughout their lives. Validation expresses I see you, you matter, I understand or try to understand you and I´m here, all without using these words. If you think about it, feeling validated has a core importance for any human (regardless of their age) yet sadly, not much is said to parents about this fundamental parenting task. Validation is a primary emotional need, (like safety and to feel loved) and should be a right.

Validation is important for a numerous amount of reasons: It impacts the capability of naming, expressing and understanding emotions (when it comes to a person´s own self and others as well), it helps the child, teen (or adult) internalize the validating model which then grows into self-validation, it helps build self-esteem and also contributes to the development of the capability of self-regulating emotions while diminishing impulsive behaviours. In terms of immediate consequences, validation helps to “emotionally hold” the child, teen (or grown up) in distress providing emotional containment, while helping them to regulate their emotions and feel secure.

To better understand what emotional validation is and how to materialize it, we also have to comprehend its counterpart: emotional invalidation. When a person feels that his or her feelings, thoughts and/or experiences are frowned upon, judged, and/or minimized, it is safe to say that invalidation is present. We have all felt invalidated at one point or another in our lives, even if we didn’t know the formal term for it. Emotionally invalidating environments in childhood can have long-lasting effects. These effects manifest themselves in the adulthood of those who have lived immersed such environments. The vast array of research available on the matter has shown that repeated and systematic invalidation can cause difficulties in identifying, expressing and regulating emotions, emotional inhibition and depression. In the most extreme cases emotionally invalidating environments have contributed to the development of difunctional behavioural tendencies, such as resorting to impulsive harmful behaviours as a means to quickly alleviate a negative emotion

But, what does emotional invalidation look like exactly?

In essence, invalidation occurs when the important adults in a child´s life aren’t attune with his/her needs and emotions. Furthermore, these adults respond to their children either by discounting or punishing the expression of such needs and emotions. Non-responsiveness is the first from of invalidation. if a child cries, soothing him or her is validating (either with words or actions) as opposed to labelling them as cry baby, for example, which conveys the non verbal message of: you shouldn’t be crying, it doesn’t make sense that you are feeling the way you are. If a child expresses a need, i.g, “I´m hungry”, responding to that need by giving choices of what he/she could have is validating, as opposed to saying: you can´t possibly be hungry, which would again convey the following non-verbal message: the sensation that you are experiencing in your body isn’t so.

If the same thing is done in terms of feelings and an adult tells a child that he/she isn’t or shouldn´t be mad (when he/she actually is), the child slowly learns that his emotions are wrong and that they don’t make sense, which can later resort in an inability to discern emotional states and also a lack of trust his or her emotions as valid and expected reactions to certain events.

Furthermore, if a family environment consistently fails in the task of paying attention to a child’s emotions, thoughts and bodily sessions, they might be inadvertently reinforcing emotional dysregulation. Why? Because a child might learn he only gets noticed and obtains what he might need form the environment, when his or her emotional expression escalates.

So, how can parents and other significant adults be emotionally validating towards their children?

Marsha Linehan, developer of DBT therapy, composed a theory of levels of validation for therapist to use in their sessions. The same theory could be extrapolated and used by parents and caregivers.

I will be using four of the six levels proposed by Linehan to give you examples on how to validate in a conscious manner.

Level one: Be present, be curious.  Pay attention to what your child says and does when he/she communicates with you. Tune in when he/she communicates (verbally or not) an emotion. Making sustained eye contact; kneeling, bending or sitting so as to be closer to the child’s actual size and level; a gentle touch etc, are all non-verbal forms of communication that can be validating.

Level two: Reflect back. Be a mirror. Accurately translate into words what you observe and let your child know. The goal is to truly try to understand your child’s inner experience and not judge it. Paraphrase when they are slightly older: “Let me see if I understood you correctly, you said that…”

Level three: Reveal the unspoken. Essentially, at level three, if the adult has been paying close attention, he can articulate things that haven’t been explicitly said. For example, a child might be crying and complaining about something his or her brother did. He hasn’t named his emotion, but the significant adult could say something along the lines of: “That must have made you feel angry”. Linehan refers to this level as mind reading and in its more complex forms, in entails figuring out not only what a person feels but what they are thinking, wishing for…etc. You can always ask if you got things right or if you are correct after mind reading.

Level four: It´s a premise from which to function: All behaviour is either caused by an event or it´s a response to one. In that light, all behaviour is understandable. This one of my favourite levels as it helps us understand and have compassion. It does not mean that any behaviour will be approved or excused. For example, a child lies to his or her teacher about completing his homework. It´s understandable that the child is afraid of telling the truth out of fear of the consequences of doing so. The adult here could let the child know that he understands that fear was felt (level 3 validation or two if the child has explained that he was scared). The adult could go on to explain that when we are afraid, most animals (humans included) do things to try to protect themselves, but that these things aren’t always the wisest. Sometimes they just serve in the short term, but only make things worse in the long run. The adult in question could then proceed to a problem-solving approach and address what the child could do to correct the dysfunctional behaviour.

So, if you are a significant adult in a child´s life, If you are his parent, his caregiver, his uncle or aunt, his teacher or perhaps his older cousin, remember the profound impact emotional validation can have in that child’s emotional development. Whether you are having a simple conversation, a heart to heart or a serious talk about discipline, please don’t forget to validate.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

Stop Walking on Eggshells

Stop Walking on Eggshells

Stop Walking on Eggshells

“Stop Walking on Eggshells”. Paul T. Mason, MS. and to Randi Kreger

Two authors go on a quest to help the readers better understand the diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, while enlightening non-diagnosed family members and friends on how to take some control over their lives and improve the relationships with their diagnosed loved ones.

The world of psychology is an enormously wide one. Within it, there are a considerable amount of trains of though and approaches. Their purpose: a better understanding of the emotional and intellectual functioning of human beings.

Some of the ideas that have emerged throughout history, have later evolved into renowned theories, paradigms or schools, that have developed their own method of both conceptualizing and approaching a problem. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for example, aims at understanding the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviours and sustains that by targeting one of the three aspects, the other two can and will undergo changes and modifications, all with the purpose of alleviating a person’s distress or reducing negative behaviors towards themselves or others.

Systemic or family therapy rests its foundation in the concept that an individual is him/her and the context she functions in. This means that a person and the problem they face cannot be isolated from a social conceptualization, because humans exist in a continuum of interpersonal relations, and these relations are the focus when understanding and addressing a problem.  We could go on for quite a while, exploring more theories, but that would divert us from the objective of this brief post.

Psychological theories or schools differ in their origins, postulates and work approaches. They also differ on the idea of whether or not “labelling” or diagnosing a person (with a disorder that has been given a name and a series of diagnostic criteria) has positive or negative influences, not only on the person that receives it but also on their family and social context.

Some people find relief in a diagnosis: they can finally name and understand what is happening to them, and they come to learn that they are not the only ones who struggle with their condition: be it a communication, eating, personality or trauma and/or stressor related disorder, among others. Other patients and clinicians, on the other hand, find that using a label or diagnosis is quite the opposite of helpful, and that the person linked to it, often feels that his or her identity is mainly constructed and understood around the condition, preventing others from seeing their strengths and healthy aspects.

After this overly-extended introduction, we can come to focus on one of those “labels”: A diagnosis that affects almost 2% of the general population, although some authors have found in their research an even higher prevalence of the disorder, affecting more women than men: Borderline Personality Disorder.

Oftentimes, we come to find the behaviors or emotional responses of a loved one-be it a friend, family member, life partner, etc- as strange, overwhelming, guilt-inducing, completely narrow (black or white constructions) or as extremely rapidly-shifting.  A lot of people can fit into the ambiguous description just addressed a few lines above. However, when a person exhibits: a continuous sense of emptiness, accompanied by deep fears of abandonment, lack of self-regulatory skills when it comes to handling emotions, alternates between idealizing and devaluating the same person, acts impulsively in ways that can be harmful to themselves, exhibits a very unstable sense of self and incurs in self harming behaviors or threatens or attempts suicide, we could be in the presence of a person struggling with Borderline Personality Disorder.

The person facing the diagnosis has a big battle to fight: Therapy (which will include intense personal awareness and work) and sometimes medication are needed to understand the disorder and make the necessary modifications and acceptances, in order to live. However, friends or family members of someone who has such diagnosis, can come to be inevitably placed in a state and/or situation that they have not chosen but need to face, nonetheless.  “Stop walking on eggshells” is a book that can easily take the shape of light to use while walking through a tunnel. It offers concrete help for those people who have the diagnosis in their life, in the form of a condition that affects someone they love. They are not the ones who have been given the diagnosis, but that does not mean that it doesn´t affect them as well.

The authors of the book have chosen the option of diagnosis, as a means to understand the struggle a person with Borderline Personality Disorder undergoes each day. Also, as a way to help change unhealthy relational patterns and give some control to those who find themselves tangled in the web of the diagnosis, but do not wish to cut out from their lives the person that faces the condition. A big thanks are owed to Paul T. Mason, MS. and to Randi Kreger (the authors), who not only use the diagnosis in order to offer a better comprehension of the condition but also take the necessary pages to examine in detail each of the diagnostic criteria proposed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

If you read the book, you will begin the process of understanding why a person with the diagnosis acts the way they act, and you will be able to start the slow process of separating them from the disorder, without diminishing the responsibility for their actions in the process. The words in the title ”Walking on Eggshells” very well describe what existence feels like for a lot of spouses, family members or friends.

They do not know where they stand: They are afraid to say or do the wrong thing, not knowing which of their actions will result in a temper outburst, a major withdrawal from their loved one or an unexpected idealization (and almost heroic perception), with the following opposite demonization, that no one knows when will come.

The dance to be learned is a delicate one, and boundaries play a very big part in it. Individuals that face the diagnosis have a very hard time with boundaries in general. One of the best ways in which a non-borderline-personality-disorder-diagnosed person can help their loved one is by constructing and maintaining healthy boundaries. Since they are a source of conflict, oftentimes they are not proposed, but they are certainly one of the key ingredients in a relationship with someone who has been diagnosed with the disorder.

The book also comes with a workbook that suggests exercises that prove very useful to both conceptualize and practice new ways of relating to a diagnosed loved one.

Underestimating the emotional pain and fear that a person with Borderline Personality Disorder experiences is a common trap people fall into. The first step is to empathize as much as you can with the person who has been diagnosed :The book will help you; once true understanding has taken place, there is a serious second step to consider: it involves asking oneself hard questions such as, what choices have I made in the past?, are they the best ones for me right now?, do I need to feel needed?, what rights do I feel I have?, what do I feel that I can ask of others?, What am I responsible for in a given relationship? These questions will help acknowledge the responsibility we have towards ourselves in any given interaction and therefore help on the path towards assertiveness.

If you choose to read the book, know that a good amount of reflection and self-criticism will be inevitably involved. But that is precisely how we can become essential blocks in the construction of healthier realities, both for ourselves and for those we love. We, as the authors, can choose to use a diagnosis for the better.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

Construyendo familias: Los rituales

Construyendo familias: Los rituales

Los psicoterapeutas y los psicólogos solemos tener un principio básico que nos acompaña en nuestro quehacer educativo y terapéutico, ayudándonos  –valga la redundancia- en nuestra  labor de “ayudar”. Ese principio se podría transmitir de muchas maneras diferentes, pero utilizando un modo claro y poco poético, sonaría algo así como:

Las rutinas en la vida de cualquier familia y niño son necesarias, porque generan un ambiente más estable y ayudan a la consolidación de comportamientos, creación de hábitos y un funcionamiento general más sano.

Muchas veces hemos oído que el ser humano es social, que necesita del contacto e interacción con otros no solo para su supervivencia, sino para el disfrute pleno de su ser y estar. Y ese buscar al otro, disfrutar de él, empatizar con sus circunstancias y descubrirlo, se hace creando lazos.  Lazos que, tal y como se encuentra diseñada la vida de hoy, posiblemente surgirán, para los más pequeños, en el lugar en el que pasan la mayor parte de sus horas de vigilia: el cole.

Suena muy utópico, para un niño de 2 años, eso de crear lazos, pero llevado al terreno práctico no significa más que “gozar de y en compañía”. A menudo se da poca importancia a las relaciones sociales de los pequeños llegando a ser incluso el aspecto que menos preocupa cuando, realmente, lo importante de que una “personita” asista a un jardín de infancia, no es que aprenda los colores, o que pueda decir los días de la semana en inglés.

Sí, esa premisa muchos la llevamos como bandera, porque creemos en ella, y porque hemos visto sus resultados positivos, no solo en la práctica clínica, sino en las familias, que como seres comunes que somos, nos rodean y pertenecen a nuestro círculo de amigos, seres queridos o conocidos. Sin ánimo de restar importancia ninguna a las rutinas, ya que yo me incluyo dentro de ese grupo que las defiende porque cree en ellas, quisiera colocarlas, por un momento, en el perchero, para abrir la puerta a un “primo” cercano de las mismas, un concepto sobre el que se piensa mucho menos pero que tiene un lado mucho más emotivo, cálido y no por ello, menos importante: El ritual.

Quizás al ver escrita la palabra ritual, pensemos en una especie de ceremonia, quizás abstracta, quizás incluso de carácter religioso, y entonces, a lo mejor, quien se encuentre leyendo empiece a preguntarse: con tanta información que hay ahí fuera para aprender cosas, ¿para qué habré empezado a leer esto?  Pero los rituales a los que aquí se hará referencia, son más cercanos. Ellos encierran en sí tanto sentido, tanto significado y tanta magia que al empezar a comprenderlos, este artículo se cargará justo de eso, de sentido y magia, y dejará de ser pesado, quizás para convertirse en algo que logre hacer sonreír.

Pensemos por un segundo en la cena de navidad en casa de los abuelos, o en los cuentos que leía papá a lo mejor una vez a la semana o al mes a la hora de dormir, o tal vez en la noche antes de que vinieran Santa Claus o los Reyes Magos, en la que les dejábamos (en algún lugar de la casa) galletas o hierba, o incluso algún bocata de chorizo.  Esos eran y son rituales. Una serie de acciones que se materializan, se convierten en hechos, por la simbología que encierran, es decir, por el significado peculiar que suponen para quien los hace y por la idea que está detrás de los mismos. Lo relevante, no es el  hecho de ponerle hierba a un camello, sino preparar con ilusión una llegada esperada e incluso transmitir empatía (vienen  de lejos y tendrán hambre). Los rituales son aquellas acciones que van conformando tradiciones.

Uno de los aspectos más positivos de los mismos es que pueden tener distintos matices en cada familia, aunque partan de algo común a más personas. Cada familia es única y por ende sus rituales tienen una dimensión única para cada una de ellas. Algunos son súper graciosos, como hacer una pijamada de adultos y niños por navidad, otros son más sentimentales, como escribir una carta anual a la tía que ya no está entre nosotros, pero lo importante es que son personales y cercanos al corazón de quienes los viven.

Los rituales en las familias son tan importantes como las rutinas. Su diferencia radica, según la Dra. B. Fiese en que en los primeros,  la comunicación tiene una finalidad muy concreta,  suceden con una temporalidad determinada y encierran un mensaje del tipo “esto es lo que necesitamos hacer”, sin que después de materializarlos se pase mucho tiempo reflexionando sobre ellos. Ayudan a que la dinámica en casa sea organizada, estable y con límites.

Los rituales, sin embargo, permiten un pasar del tiempo compartido, en el que conocemos a los demás mejor.

A través de ellos se contribuye  al desarrollo de un sentido de seguridad, porque los niños saben cómo van a suceder y qué esperar de los mismo, pero lo más bonito y mágico de los rituales es que construyen un sentido de pertenencia a un grupo único: la familia y ayudan a forjar una identidad: “estos somos nosotros”.

Quizás la de “somos los Pérez, esos que (además de otras cosas claro está) hacen un picnic una vez al mes” o “somos los Martínez, para quienes la primavera es sinónimo de ilusión y, con la llegada de la misma, celebramos el día del cambio de armarios con música, en pijamas moradas y con macarrones al horno”. A diferencia de las rutinas, los rituales si conllevan pensamientos posteriores acerca de los mismos. Pensamiento con los que también se recuerda un sentir. Espero que, a estas alturas los rituales ya hayan empezado a inundar estas letras con su magia y me estén ayudando a hacer sonreír a quien, pese a los párrafos más técnicos, decidió seguir leyendo.

No se trata de elegir algo al azar y empezar a hacerlo todos los años, sino más bien de continuar con tradiciones establecidas por generaciones precedentes, siempre y cuando se comparta el sentido que encierran, o bien crear rituales nuevos basados en la reflexión de qué se quiere transmitir a través de ellos. Hay padres que optan por hacerse una foto todos los años en el mismo lugar para que la familia pueda ver “cómo hemos ido creciendo”, pero sabiendo a la vez que “crecen juntos” y que siguen estando ahí los unos para los otros. Otros disfrutan por ejemplo de inaugurar el inicio de cada curso escolar con una cena especial en la que se habla de los sueños que cada uno tiene para ese nuevo comienzo académico. Lo verdaderamente importante es que los rituales existan, tengan la peculiaridad que tengan.

La literatura psicológica dedicada al estudio de familias, publicada a través de la American Psychological Association sostiene, por ejemplo, que los padres que conocen mejor a sus hijos son capaces de desarrollar estrategias de parentalidad más eficaces y por ende, de sentirse -ellos mismos- más competentes y seguros de sí. Los rituales son una manera “especial” de estar con los nuestros. Pasar tiempo juntos, ya sea comiendo o jugando es lo que va a permitir saber más de las peculiaridades de cada miembro de la familia, de eso que lo hace a cada uno ser ella o él y a la larga, ese conocimiento es lo que nos va a permitir apreciar, valorar, querer y saber cómo estar ahí para aquellos quienes son nuestros compañeros de la vida, y que se han convertido en piezas clave de nuestras existencias, nuestras familias.

Aquel que regala un ritual regala algo que construye, que perdura y que trasciende.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

De corderos, amigos y el arte de conocer

De corderos, amigos y el arte de conocer

Así como la sabiduría misma puede revelarse a través de las cosas más sencillas, resulta ser que a menudo, grandes tratados de psicología se encuentran escondidos en los recovecos más insospechados e incluso aparentemente ingenuos.  He aquí uno de ellos.

En algún lugar del capítulo 4, del que puede considerarse uno de los más tiernos e inocentes relatos, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry en su “Principito”  nos cuenta como la prueba de que este pequeño existió, “es que era encantador, que reía y que quería un cordero”.  Subrayemos aquí el concepto de querer un cordero y remontémonos al relato.  El Principito, aquel “hombrecillo rubio”,  como lo llamaba el narrador y piloto de la historia le pide nada más y nada menos, justo en el momento en que lo conoce, que le dibuje un cordero. Y la razón por la que le pide un cordero, es porque quiere un amigo.  Para Antoine, la prueba  fehaciente de la existencia  de aquel ser menudo, era el hecho de quería  un amigo. Poco más merece, según el autor,  ser destacado como testimonio de la vida del “hombrecillo” y está psicológicamente en lo cierto.

El existir no se concibe sin el anhelo de un otro.

Muchas veces hemos oído que el ser humano es social, que necesita del contacto e interacción con otros no solo para su supervivencia, sino para el disfrute pleno de su ser y estar. Y ese buscar al otro, disfrutar de él, empatizar con sus circunstancias y descubrirlo, se hace creando lazos.  Lazos que, tal y como se encuentra diseñada la vida de hoy, posiblemente surgirán, para los más pequeños, en el lugar en el que pasan la mayor parte de sus horas de vigilia: el cole.

Suena muy utópico, para un niño de 2 años, eso de crear lazos, pero llevado al terreno práctico no significa más que “gozar de y en compañía”. A menudo se da poca importancia a las relaciones sociales de los pequeños llegando a ser incluso el aspecto que menos preocupa cuando, realmente, lo importante de que una “personita” asista a un jardín de infancia, no es que aprenda los colores, o que pueda decir los días de la semana en inglés.

A los padres eso los alienta, hace que en sus torsos crezca el sentimiento de orgullo, que ojo, es muy importante; sin embargo, lo realmente trascendental es que los pequeños aprenda a vincularse, a interpretar señales sociales, a compartir y a buscar y disfrutar la interacción con sus pares. Los padres, no están en el cole, pero el ejemplo vivo de una conducta empática o emotivamente divertida no requiere su presencia continua en el centro escolar. Al llegar al cole a buscar a los más pequeños (con sus 2 o 3 años), no sólo hay que limitarse a preguntarles por su día, de hecho, escasa introspección y reflexión  podrán ofrecer.

Tomarse 5 minutos para además de darle todos los besos y abrazos que quepan en ese instante, preguntarles si un chico o chica específico ha ido al cole ese día, proponerles que vayan a decirle adiós o que vayan a ver si está jugando con sus padres en el arenero y entonces acompañarle, interesarse por el “amigo”, hablarle, hacerle reír, etc.,  va a servir de modelo a una conducta y a la vez despertará un interés que va más allá del mecánico “interactuar educado”.

Hay que fomentar la construcción de vínculos realmente significativos en los niños, tengan la edad que tengan.  Y para ello hay que potenciar las interacciones sociales en los chicos, fuera del colegio también, inscribiéndolos en alguna actividad extracurricular, haciendo el esfuerzo de salir con ellos al parque y asistirlos en la labor de relacionarse con otros o incluso utilizando los “play dates” o citas de juego, que son comunes en Estados Unidos y pueden ser un recurso al cual recurrir si vemos que nuestros chicos se sienten más cómodos en grupos pequeños y en un ambiente conocido y más reducido como puede ser una casa.  A la vez, los play dates sirven también para que los padres, que han de “modelar” aquello que quieren ver en sus hijos, tengan la ocasión de conocer a otros padres abriendo así posibilidades para ellos mismos.

Todos los adultos sabemos que las experiencias sociales únicas, o los vínculos especiales son los que realmente crean una resonancia emocional en nosotros, una sensación incluso física de “emoción” cuando pensamos en personas queridas o las vemos. Y la razón por la que estos sucede, es que han dejado de ser completamente ajenas y se han convertido un poco en “nuestras”. Hemos pues, creado un lazo con ellas. Se podría decir (tomando prestado el concepto tal y como lo utilizó De Saint-Exupéry) que hemos “domesticado” a alguien, o nos han “domesticado” a nosotros.

Remontémonos otra vez al relato que nos ocupa, para centrarnos esta vez en una propuesta: Propuesta que un zorro hace al pequeño Principito, quien estuvo poco tiempo en el planeta tierra, pero hizo a otros parte de sí y también se hizo él parte de otros: “Si me domesticas -dijo el zorro, seré para ti único en el mundo. Serás para mí único en el mundo…mi vida se llenará de sol”. Astutas criaturas son los zorros, y este más aún. He aquí el gran, sabio y pequeño secreto a voces del que se hizo eco y que escogió compartir con su amigo de rubios cabellos: “Sólo se conocen las cosas que se domestican. Los hombres ya no tienen tiempo para conocer nada”.

Hay cosas que merece la pena que se extingan, como los hombres que ya no tienen tiempo para conocer nada. Y hay pequeños grandes tratados que merecen la pena ser compartido, como éste. Pero sobre todo, hay cosas que merecen la inversión de todo el tiempo que sea necesario para cultivarlas, tal y como el que un niño aprenda a domesticar.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

El enfado y las tortugas

El enfado y las tortugas

Cuántas veces no habremos visto a un niño pequeño (y no tan pequeño) ser dominado por sus emociones. Una rabieta, lágrimas o gritos desproporcionados ante un evento relativamente poco importante o tal vez un cerrarse en si mismo y negar cualquier interacción con el medio, son algunas de las maneras en las que niños, adolescentes e incluso algún mayor, experimentan frustración, enfado, vergüenza o distrés en general.

A lo largo de nuestras vidas, todos vamos aprendiendo cómo expresar lo que sentimos, y una parte importante de ese expresar es la modulación. Las emociones (produzcan estas sensaciones agradables o displacenteras) tienen cada una su razón de ser y estar entre nosotros: ¿qué sería del mundo por ejemplo, si no existiera el enfado? Podríamos pensar, como bien lo explican algunos niños que sin el enfado, “no me importaría si me hiciesen algo malo, no me defendería” o “no me daría cuenta de que algo no me ha gustado”. Cuánta razón tienen… Ahora bien, una expresión desbordada, a destiempo o incluso que pueda hacer daño a la persona que experimenta y expresa la emoción o a otras a su alrededor, no beneficia a nadie. De ahí que la modulación o regulación (como quiera etiquetarse) sea un factor importante a la hora de “dejar ver” lo que se siente.

Cada emoción tiene su razón de ser, como bien me han dejado claro alguno de los pequeños con los que interactúo día tras día. Esto puede ser una obviedad, pero si vemos alguien sonreír, de seguro esa sonrisa ha venido precedida por una causa que resulta agradable a ese alguien. Si alguien siente una emoción, ha habido pues un evento desencadenante.

De ahí que las emociones (y el sentirlas) no debe ser ignorado por un adulto frente a un niño. Las emociones deben ser identificadas, nombradas y validadas.

Así es como alguien pequeño va a aprendiendo lo que siente y en el mejor de los casos, a comprender la causa de ese sentir.

Y qué tendrá que ver una tortuga con sentir, modular y dejar ver…Cuando pensamos en una tortuga, a lo mejor nos viene a la cabeza una imagen de pasividad, o incluso de cobardía, pero lo cierto es que es un animal que por una parte refleja tranquilidad, y por otra, sabe cuando protegerse. La tortuga fue pues el animal elegido para desarrollar la adaptación infantil de una metodología de regulación emocional en adultos con problemas de manejo de ira. Dicha adaptación (desarrollada por Schneider y Robin, 1990) es precisamente lo que quiero compartir con aquel que se haya animado a descubrir, leyendo, la relación entre el enfado y las tortugas.

La “Técnica de la tortuga” consta de varios pasos y aunque su uso fue concebido para dar respuesta al desbordamiento e impulsividad nacientes del enfado, hoy en día también se usa para el fomentar el autocontrol en niños con trastorno por déficit de atención con hiperactividad. Hay distintas versiones sobre como entrenar a los niños para usar el método. Quizás la más simple es la resumida.

  • Cuando ocurra algo que te haga sentir frustrado o enfadado date cuenta de lo que estás sintiendo, y cómo se siente en tu cuerpo (¿tienes calor? ¿Se notan tus músculos estirados o tensos? ¿Sientes muchas ganas de llorar?)
  • Piensa en la palabra STOP o DETENTE, y mantén tus manos, piernas y palabras quietas.
  • Cierra los ojos, métete en tu caparazón y empieza a respirar profundo, cogiendo aire por la nariz y soltándolo por la boca. A la vez, piensa en pensamientos que te ayuden a calmarte, tales como: “Yo sé como sentirme más tranquilo”, “si respiro despacio puedo calmarme”, “cuando me sienta más relajado lo puedo volver a intentar …”
  • Sal del caparazón cuando hayas pensado en una solución o cuando te encuentres relajado y puedas hablar del problema que has tenido.

Es muy probable que una vez conozcan estos pasos, necesitemos enseñar a los pequeños maneras en las que puedan solucionar conflictos, es decir, a producir el paso número cuatro de una manera más concreta y con ejemplos prácticos, partiendo de situaciones que puedan ocurrir en casa o en el cole.

Hoy en día muchas veces pretendemos que nuestros niños se instruyan solos, que tengan todas las respuestas antes de tiempo, que no se “porten mal” y que sean modélicos, casi robots… Hay que instruirlos, enseñarles, tomarse el tiempo de explicarles por qué “no se pega” o cómo mamá y papá también se enfadan y qué hacen para sentirse mejor. Es mejor tener a pequeños ensayando cómo ser tortugas y no a adultos desprovistos de herramientas para luchar contra la hiena, hipopótamo, oso pardo o tal vez tiburón que a veces despiertan en nosotros.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

Por qué el jugar no es un juego

Por qué el jugar no es un juego

Si pedimos a un adulto que piense en un momento feliz de su infancia, obtendremos múltiples respuestas pero de seguro, la mayoría de ellas tengan algo que ver con la actividad más deseada de la niñez: el juego.

Los expertos en salud mental siempre han hablado de la importancia del juego en los años infantiles, pero ¿por qué es tan vital para la integridad de un niño el jugar?

A través del juego los pequeños conocen el mundo que les rodean, se relacionan con el y sus elementos, lo procesan, aprenden a interactuar con otros, expresan sus pensamientos, ensayan roles de la vida adulta y crecen física, emocional e intelectualmente. De hecho es tal la importancia de esta actividad que ha quedado reconocida por la Comisión de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos como un derecho fundamental de cada niño.

Aquellos que estamos en contacto continuo con niños (bien porque nuestra profesión gire en torno a ellos, o bien porque formen parte de nuestras vidas de la manera más cercana posible, dándonos una identidad y con ella una función de padres, tíos, abuelos…) somos testigos del placer y alegría que invade a los pequeños al correr, construir, disfrazarse, acunar, pilotar, lanzar o ser (por un momento) alguien distinto…

Los beneficios de una infancia rica en horas de juego son extensos:

  • Los niños utilizan (a la vez que desarrollan) la creatividad y la imaginación; construyen un mundo sobre el que tienen dominio, encontrándose con la posibilidad de incidir en el, lo que permite superar miedos y practicar roles diversos
  • Desarrollan habilidades sociales y de interacción a la vez que exploran gustos y construyen su identidad, pasando también por un aprendizaje de estrategias de negociación, resolución de conflictos y defensas de los propios intereses

A través de sus fantasías puestas en acción, los pequeños nos ofrecen una ventana para entenderlos mejor y comprender sus percepciones y frustraciones, sin la necesidad de demasiadas palabras. Es por ello que un tiempo de juego “no estructurado” entre padres e hijos es tan vital para un niño como beber o respirar.

Mientras la carga académica y la preocupación por los deberes adquieren una importancia contundente, el tiempo dedicado a jugar se ve relegado a un tercer plano.

Si a esto se suma el cansancio que conlleva para los padres cumplir con sus responsabilidades diarias y la prisa y la demanda a la que se enfrentan en estos tiempos no sólo los adultos, sino también los pequeños, la verdad es que queda poco tiempo y pocas energías para meterse debajo de una cama o unos cojines y “fulminar a los malvados” al “ganar la pelea” o tal vez para “llevar al bebé que está malito al doctor después de una larga noche de llantos y atenciones”.

Los padres pueden hacer y hacen muchas cosas por sus hijos, pero sin duda alguna una de las que más les va a marcar y ayudar es jugar con ellos. Lo que se construye entre un pequeño y un adulto al jugar es casi tan mágico como el juego mismo. El juego es una manera de vinculación estrecha entre padres e hijos, es una manera de hacer llegar el mensaje de: “eres importantísimo y te quiero dar y estoy dando toda mi atención”. Pensemos, por un segundo, lo que podemos ayudar a construir en un pequeño con un mensaje así.

Para existir utilizamos el tiempo que nos ha sido dado, pero para lo trascendental, si hace falta, el tiempo hay que fabricarlo. Acompañemos, construyamos, riamos, sintamos, mediemos, queramos a nuestros niños: Juguemos con ellos.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

“Life without ED”. “La vida sin ED”

“Life without ED”. “La vida sin ED”

“Life without ED”. “La vida sin ED”

Libro: “Life without ED”. “La vida sin ED”.2004. Jenni SChaefer con la colaboración de Tom Rutledge.

Nadie se imaginaría, al ver el título de este libro que ED no es una persona. De hecho, la mayoría de las mujeres pensarían que es un libro destinado a ayudarlas en un proceso de ruptura, separación o a superar la muerte de un cónyuge o ser querido; nada más alejado del verdadero contenido de esta obra, simple, pero llena de realidad y a la vez de esperanza.

Por sus siglas en inglés, ED corresponde a la terminología “Eating disorder” en español Trastorno de la conducta alimenticia, utilizada por psicólogos y psiquiatras para diagnosticar a personas que tienen dificultades en su relación con la comida.

Jenni, la autora del libro, narra cómo consiguió, con la ayuda de su terapeuta Tom (quien está vivo no sólo a través del relato de Jenni, sino que hace aportes escritos por él mismo a la obra) declarar su independencia frente al trastorno de conducta alimentaria que la había acompañado casi desde su niñez. A través de sus palabras, Jenni manifiesta de una manera llana los altibajos experimentados durante su proceso de independización y lo hace con capítulos cortos, que hablan sobre cómo fue viviendo aspectos y situaciones puntuales de las distintas esferas vitales que toca un trastorno de esta índole.

Es una aproximación realista y a la vez terapéutica del viaje continuo y laborioso que emprende alguien cuando está decidido a luchar contra su propio ED. El forma parte (lamentablemente protagónica) de la vida de quien lo sufre, pero puede ser desterrado, puesto fuera y combatido si se asume el compromiso consigo mismo, de sabotear a ED, sus costumbres y sus mensajes. Desvincularse de un trastorno alimenticio es un proceso complicado, requiere mucho trabajo y enfrentarse a cosas de la propia persona que son difíciles de admitir; vas más allá de comer, dejar de hacerlo o vomitar.

Contar el libro sirve de poco, hablar sobre las técnicas terapéuticas utilizadas por Jenni y lo que la ayudó tiene poco sentido cuando existe la opción de vivir la historia a través de sus protagonistas: Tom, Jenni y ED. Si crees que tu, o alguien que conoces está librando una batalla contra un trastorno de conducta alimentaria, busca asistencia psicológica, conoce a Jenni a través de “Life Without ED” y quédate con esta cita:

“No se trata de perder kilos. Solo hay una cosa por la que hay que hacer todos los esfuerzos posibles por perder, y es tu problema con la comida”.

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé

Summer holidays are here: Importance of Friendship

Summer holidays are here: Importance of Friendship

When we think of friendship, many names can pop into our heads. Friendship is one of the most beautiful and fragile relationships we experience in life. Most of us have had friends, and are probably going to make new ones. However, are we really aware of how our friendships have helped us? Why friends are so important in our lives? And most importantly, what are the lessons in life that friendship teaches us?

When I was a child, my sister and I used to get together with the neighbour kids and create shows.

There would be numerous acts, we would sing, dance and even play instruments. We created tickets and offered refreshments for our parent audience members. Preparing the show involved inspiration, arguments, negotiation, patience, and occasional tears. For most adults, some of our fondest memories of childhood involve the times we spent playing with friends. In some sense, friendship is what childhood is all about. Friends are not only a source of fun; they also help children grow in meaningful ways, which will then make them become the adults they are now.

Friends are a very important part of life, at any age. They can affect our happiness, self-confidence and achievements. Friendships help develop independence and a sense of who we are as an individual – unique and separate to our family.

Here are some of the main things that friendship teaches us:

  • Helps develop Social Skills. There are many different definitions of social skills, but I think of them as the abilities necessary to get along with others. Social skills are about being able to flexibly adjust our behaviour to fit a particular situation and our personal needs and desires.
  • Teaches Sharing. Another key basis of friendship is mutual sharing between friends. Friendship usually gives us the first lesson in sharing. When we share our toys with a friend as a toddler, or our snacks in school, to office coffee time, even clothes before a party, everything seems better when shared with a friend! Sharing teaches us to be unselfish and generous.
  • Self- esteem. Friends help children begin to discover who they are outside their family. Friendships are based on common interests, so by choosing friends, children declare something about who they are: “My friends and I play basketball” or “We all like the Twilight Vampires!” When children have a friend who likes them, they will start to perceive themselves as capable while also feeling loved. Healthy self-esteem is like a child's armour against the challenges of the world. Kids who know their strengths and weaknesses and feel good about themselves have an easier time handling conflicts and resisting negative pressures.
  • Problem Solving and Coping Strategies. A friend is an ally. Having a friend means it’s easier to cope with disappointments. Some kids cope with stressful or difficult situations better than others, and studies have indicated that friendship is an important variable. For example, children who have at least one reciprocal friend are less likely to become depressed. Friendships give children lots of opportunities to work out disagreements. This gives kids a chance to practice skills of persuasion, negotiation, compromise, acceptance, and forgiveness. Having a close friend is linked to improvements in knowledge of effective problem-solving strategies.
  • Empathy. Probably the most important benefit of friendship is that it encourages children to move beyond self-interest. Caring about a friend, or just wanting to play with a friend can help children control selfish impulses and encourage caring responses. To maintain a friendship, children need to learn to recognize and respond positively to their friend’s feelings. Friendships are fun and painful, exciting and frustrating, challenging, enjoyable, and unpredictable - just like life! Whether children are putting on a show, negotiating where to play tag, or deciding which videogame to play together, they are developing the skills they will use throughout their lives.

With all of this said, I encourage you to get out and make friends or to make time for the friends you have for the benefit of your health and well-being.

HAPPY SUMMER HOLIDAYS!

Division of Psychology, Psychotherapy and Coaching
Rocío Fernández Cosme
Psychologist
Children, adolescents and adults
Languages: English and Spanish
See Resumé